No bread is an island

...entire of itself. (With apologies to John Donne!)
I live and breathe breadmaking. I’m an evangelist who would like everyone to make his or her own bread. I want to demystify breadmaking and show it as the easy everyday craft that it is. To this end I endeavour to make my recipes as simple and as foolproof as I possibly can.

I call my blog 'No bread is an island' because every bread is connected to another bread. So a spicy fruit bun with a cross on top is a hot cross bun. This fruit dough will also make a fruit loaf - or Chelsea buns or a Swedish tea ring...
I'm also a vegan, so I have lots of vegan recipes on here - and I'm adding more all the time.

Saturday, 19 January 2013

SPELT SODA BREADS - PLAIN AND FOCACCIA




These are two soda breads made with wheat - and a fair amount of olive oil
Ingredients:
400g spelt flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsps cream of tartar*
1 tsp bicarb of soda*
250ml water
Good glug olive oil (optional)

Method:
1.     Since the cream of tartar and the bicarbonate of soda – the raising agents – begin working as soon as they come into contact with the water, it is essential to have everything ready before mixing the dough. So, heat the oven to 220C, 425F, gas mark 7 and either grease your baking sheet or line it with baking parchment.

2.     Place the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl, add the cream of tartar and bicarb of soda and stir the dry ingredients to mix them evenly. When the oven is hot, add the liquid and begin mixing with a palette knife or similar.

3.     Mix together into a soft dough, adding more flour or water as needed. Turn it out onto a floured worktop, firmly mould it into a round flat loaf, about 3cm thick and place it on your prepared baking sheet. (With practice you can get the mixing and shaping done in less than two minutes.) To allow the heat of the oven to reach the centre of the dough more easily, cut a deep cross into the top of the loaf with a sharp knife.

4.     Bake in the centre of the oven for 25-30 minutes,

5.     The loaf is ready when it has a good colour underneath and a skewer comes out clean. You may need to put it back in, upside down, for a few more minutes. Place to cool on a wire rack and – for a softer crust – wrap the bread in a tea cloth.

*You can of course use 3 teaspoons of baking powder instead of the cream of tartar and bicarb of soda.


Soda bread focaccia with oatmeal and rosemary
Here's Penny, on one of my workshops, just adding olive oil to her rosemary focaccia (yeast-risen)
Ingredients:
300g spelt flour
100g fine or medium oatmeal
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsps cream of tartar*
1 tsp bicarb of soda*
250ml water
3 tablespoons olive oil

Plus:
Olive oil to drizzle
Sprigs of fresh rosemary - or 2 teaspoons of dried

Method:
1.     Pre-heat oven to 220C, 425F, gas mark 7 and prepare your baking sheet – either grease it or line it with bakingparchment. (The baking sheet should have a lip so that the olive oil won't spill everywhere!)

2.     Place the flour, oatmeal and salt into a large mixing bowl, add the cream of tartar and bicarb of soda and stir the dry ingredients to mix them evenly. When the oven is hot, add the water and oil, and begin mixing with a palette knife or similar.

3.     Mix together into a soft dough, adding more flour or water as needed. Turn it out onto a floured worktop, mould it into a cob shape, roll it out into a large circle, about 2cm thick and place it on your prepared baking sheet. (With practice you can get the mixing and shaping done in less than two minutes.) 

4.    Press your fingertips into the dough, making large indentations. Press sprigs of rosemary
 into the holes and drizzle oil all over the dough. Or: Drizzle the oil and sprinkle the dried rosemary all over

Follow steps 4-5 in the above recipe.

Notes:
*You can of course use 3 teaspoons of baking powder instead of the cream of tartar and bicarb.


1 comment:

  1. I have printed both out, will give them a try. Oatmeal one look especially interesting.
    Thanks
    Mamta

    ReplyDelete